Doctor Who is Lenny Henry making Margaret Thatcher jokes in a TARDIS. Doctor Who is Jon Pertwee yelling SPLINK! Doctor Who is any knitted scarf of a certain length or greater. Doctor Who is my nephews mesmerised by an old Peter Davison episode. Doctor Who is the KLF. Doctor Who is holding a sink plunger in one hand and an egg whisk in the other. Doctor Who is so deeply entrenched in the culture that you can’t actually dig it out or say what it is, because Doctor Who is everything.

Not all of that quote made it into this interview me and Rob WIlliams did for The Hollywood Reporter about our new Eleventh Doctor comic, but it’s how I feel.

(There was also a bit where I said that any packet of Golden Wonder with Colin Baker’s face on was canon. I stand by that.)

(Via alewing)

Your nephews’ mesmerisation reached its limit the other week when we watched TERMINUS. (I made them keep going. It’s character building.)

(via tomewing)

You utter bastard.

Still, Enlightenment is wonderful. But eesh. Have mercy with Warriors of the Deep at least. I think there’s legal precedent establishing that showing that to a child is a form of abuse. 

(via philsandifer)

*Ainleyish cackle*

Luckily - or unluckily in Enlightenment’s case, though we’ll get to it - we’re not watching them in order. They pick the Doctor they want to see this time, occasionally make a monster request, and then if there’s an arc on the go we watch whichever the next one is. (Hence Terminus - we’d watched Mawdryn - actual brain-exposed scares - and there was a request to know what happens next with “bird guy”.)

So we just had Rise Of The Cybermen/Age Of Steel (which I’d not seen since broadcast and was lovely to watch with kids, as I’m betting most of the RTD monster two-parters are - though even a 7-year old realises “Delete! Delete!” is a crap catchphrase) Next: Day Of The Daleks.

(I think it’ll be a long time, if ever, before I crack open the Warriors DVD. I watched it as a kid and mainly remember it as really dourly boring. Even to a DWM subscribing, Longleat-going boy (who had really enjoyed Terminus!) I think it did feel “grown-up” to me age 10, but almost all the Davison era had that going for it, bits of it even deservedly. If it wasn’t for the BBC’s fiendish box set packaging I’d have skipped it.)

(Source: alewing)

(Reblogged from philsandifer)

Cats like Phoenix like Phoenix

Oh and we get The Phoenix on subscription, that usually vanishes up into the kids room so I don’t look at it as much as I should. Some lovely art in that tho.

Pull List

Regular comics (all digital except the “trade waiting” bit)

Buying: Mighty Avengers, Loki, Ms Marvel, Pretty Deadly, Sex, Weekly Shonen Jump (just started with this, gosh what a bargain)

Catching up on, not sure if I’m on board with regularly: Sex Criminals, Black Science, Great Pacific, She-Hulk, & I buy almost every Image #1 so there’s a pile I haven’t even read yet, and I’ll be trying all the hott new titles I hear so much about.

Trade-Waiting: Prophet, Saga, Hawkeye.

I have a nagging feeling I’ve forgotten something. Anyhow, this is all very new-mainstreamy stuff, and almost all Marvel and Image, you might note. A lot of this is down to the fact that I’ve been using the Image DRM-free files (which I love) and the Marvel app, and have forgotten my Comixology password. Once I rediscover that I’m very open to other good monthlies, though I’m not desperate to read more Marvels or any DCs these days. My tastes are lite adventure comics basically.

What are you reading?

Big Tent

I got a bunch of replies to my “late 90s British culture” question, here and on Twitter. Edited and compiled below.

MUSIC: Big beat. UK Garage. Ibiza. Fatboy Slim. Craig David. “Re-Rewind”. Robbie. Travis. Stereophonics. Kid A. Gomez. “Groovejet”. All Saints. Catatonia. Peak Boyband. So Solid Crew. Basement Jaxx. Belle And Sebastian. Chemikal Underground. S Club 7 and kids pop. Steps. Daphne & Celeste.

TV AND FILM: Spaced. Ali G. League Of Gentlemen. Big Brother. Lock Stock and British gangster films. Goodness Gracious Me. Queer As Folk. Billy Elliott. Zoe Ball. SMTV/CDUK. Who Wants To Be A Millionnaire? Changing Rooms. Topless darts. Robot Wars. Jonathan Creek. Cold Feet. Dom Joly. Banzai. Soccer AM. Docusoaps. Nigella Bites. The Office (dunno if The Office quite belongs to this phase or the next tho)

OTHER STUFF: Beckham. WAGs. Ringtones. SMS. Harry Potter. Good Friday Agreement. Zadie Smith. No Logo. Bacardi Breezers. The Millennium Dome. Mandelson. Y2K. Slow internet. Dotcom bubble. Friends Reunited. EasyJet. Kosovo. Foot And Mouth. Name and shame. Playstation. Nick Hornby. Gail Porter. Moby on adverts.

IMPORTS: Nu-Metal. Ally McBeal. Cher. Buffy. AOL. Sunny D. The Matrix. Audiogalaxy, Napster, Kazaa. Destinys Child. Britney. Eminem. Flaming Lips. Elliot Smith. Borders, H&M. Pokemon. Digimon. French Touch. Placebo.

That’s a good start, it gives some themes to work with trying to get a handle on the period - a complacent time in many ways, prosperous, hedonistic, grimly blokey, not as nationalistic or cartoonish as the mid-90s: a nation at ease with itself, and casually interested in itself - finding virtue and intrigue in the ordinary. The downside is that it’s a pretty beige time, the upside maybe being that space was made for other kinds of “ordinary” to stake a claim as British in a way Britpop hadn’t allowed - Craig David, So Solid, Goodness Gracious Me, Queer As Folk. There’s a ton of stuff that doesn’t fit into that broad picture, but it’s a decent hypothetical frame. Thanks to everyone who responded!

After this you get the high 00s - 02-08ish - which feel different from this, but unpacking how is a job for another day.

Doctor Who is Lenny Henry making Margaret Thatcher jokes in a TARDIS. Doctor Who is Jon Pertwee yelling SPLINK! Doctor Who is any knitted scarf of a certain length or greater. Doctor Who is my nephews mesmerised by an old Peter Davison episode. Doctor Who is the KLF. Doctor Who is holding a sink plunger in one hand and an egg whisk in the other. Doctor Who is so deeply entrenched in the culture that you can’t actually dig it out or say what it is, because Doctor Who is everything.

Not all of that quote made it into this interview me and Rob WIlliams did for The Hollywood Reporter about our new Eleventh Doctor comic, but it’s how I feel.

(There was also a bit where I said that any packet of Golden Wonder with Colin Baker’s face on was canon. I stand by that.)

(Via alewing)

Your nephews’ mesmerisation reached its limit the other week when we watched TERMINUS. (I made them keep going. It’s character building.)

(Reblogged from alewing)

(Source: notienedesperdicio)

(Reblogged from katherinestasaph)

The Late 90s

(This started life in my head as a reply to this philsandifer post about the 90s, but I realised I wanted to enable answers so I snaffled it for me, me, me.)

Reaching the end of the Britpop years on Popular, combined with the current nostalgia-drive in the media, means that I’ve been trying to get a grip on “the 90s” and specifically the late 90s, I like having some sort of narrative - or thesis - in my head about what was going on in pop culture in general, as you need some context when you’re approaching a topic bit by unrepresentative bit.

But the British late 90s - which we’ll extend to the whole turn of the millennium period - is very slippery for me. First Blair term, or between Diana and 9/11 if you like - what actually happened? I know what happened in American pop culture, because I was on the Internet all the bloody time. But Britain feels more oblique. UK garage, dadrock, a hard rock resurgence, Radiohead… that covers some of the music, but what about TV, films, art (we’re at peak YBA I guess), fashion, gaming, the British internet (cue LCD Soundsystem: “I was there….”)…?

Part of the problem is that the end of Britpop is still the current limit of UK historicisation, for music anyway. It’s when the great common mythology of British pop music seems to fizzle out. Glib historicisation is grim, but its absence is weird too, an unbarking dog. So it’s a limbo era - stuff that happened 12-16 years ago should have been packaged up by now, should feel like ‘a time’ ripe for dismissal, nostalgia, argument. But it seems to me that this hasn’t happened. Perhaps I’m just too old to notice it happening - that’s very possible. Perhaps the cultural press of everywhere else just became too much for ‘dear old Blighty’. Perhaps Simon Reynolds was right about ‘retromania’. Perhaps it’s too complicated…

(From a Popular perspective it’s an odd feeling and an opportunity - over the decade plus I’ve been writing the blog I’ve had narratives to fall back on or push against. From this point on there isn’t really a settled one - which is the opportunity, too, of course. More difficult, more fun.)

Anyhow, over to you. Not just music, everything cultural. Britain. ‘98-‘01. What first comes to mind? And - what’s the story?

(Reblogged from marathonpacks)

colsmi:

Alan Moore & Alan Davis’ D.R.& Quinch, as drawn by Grant Morrison, from the back cover of June 1984’s Fusion #3.

!! One for Last War In Albion fans. http://www.philipsandifer.com/p/the-last-war-in-albion.html

(Reblogged from colsmi)

Down Down

And, inevitably, the worst.

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